RVA Mag

Added on by Devil Whale.
The Devil Whale, a Salt Lake City quartet led by singer-songwriter Brinton Jones, is bringing their soulful brand of alternative rock n' roll to Richmond this Thursday at the Camel, and we are all more fortunate for it. Touring behind their most recent full-length, Teeth, The Devil Whale translate that album's high-quality production into the live environment with aplomb, delivering complex, mult-faceted, but always catchy tunes highlighted by Jones's memorable voice, which hits the sweet spot between the sincerity of Wilco's Jeff Tweedy and the virtuosity of the late, great Jeff Buckley. The Devil Whale have a lot to offer to RVA indie rock fans, and any who aren't at the Camel to experience their live performance will be kicking themselves.
Read More

You Hear That?

Added on by Devil Whale.
“Golden” is a clinic in contrasting textures — the distorted guitar that kicks the song into gear with a fantastic ascending riff set against the shimmering high-frequency synth tones that come in soon afterward, the Rhodes-y keys that form a subtle backbone juxtaposed with arpeggiated guitar notes’ shifting color and shape, verses that breathe comfortably leading into full-sounding choruses. Second track “Indian” shares many of the same qualities, adding a truly exuberant chorus — the kind of display that makes you want to clap along, even when you’re driving and should probably be using your hands to safely operate your motor vehicle.
Read More

Daytrotter

Added on by Devil Whale.
The terrific Salt Lake City band, The Devil Whale, makes us feel as if we're out there amongst the great wilderness, with no idea about what's gonna happen next. We are drinking out of tin cups and ladles, we're wearing buffalo hides for coats and we're shooting and skinning bears to protect ourselves, sure, but also for the rug that's going to cover the floor of the den in our feeble wooden shack, in the middle of nowhere. Lead singer Brinton Jones has a singing style that brings to mind Jeff Tweedy doing Fleetwood Mac songs, or at least coming close to that mood and that place. He writes in a way that seems to tap into the complexities of what happens when we just want to have things flow evenly.
Read More

Hear Ya Review

Added on by Devil Whale.
Teeth is their sophomore effort and in my limited time with it, the band that always springs to mine when listening to them is Dr. Dog. The Devil Whale share the same knack of playing delightful psych-pop smothered in wonderful three piece harmonies.
Read More

The Vinyl District - Live Review

Added on by Devil Whale.
Those dreamy chords I mentioned hearing from the bar? They belonged to The Devil Whale, a five-piece band from Salt Lake City. Their sound was a blend of folk and beach vibes. Let me try to articulate this. They’ve got these guitar lines that beg me to pack up the car and head over to Cali, but then they’ve also got these moments where they’re just rocking out on their guitars, stomping around the stage, going to town with tambourines, and it reminds me of the music you hear in the countryside ... Everything’s perfect about the stage set-up, right down to the lighting. These guys look like they’re just your everyday guys, up there sharin’ a little music. It’s low-key, welcoming. And my god, their harmonies are so gorgeous.
Read More

The Backstage Beat - Live Review

Added on by Devil Whale.
The Devil Whale opened the show, their first ever in Boston. The band, from Salt Lake City, had a cool SoCal alt rock vibe with folk elements. With appealing and brisk tracks, The Devil Whale absolutely killed it for their 30 minutes onstage. Brinton Jones’ vocals wavered over the Pacific-coast-type lilts supplemented by bassist Jake Fish, drummer Cameron Runyan, guitarist Jamie Timm, and keyboardist Wren Kennedy.
Read More

Icarus & Occident

Added on by Devil Whale.
The band took the stage with a fire that had never accompanied them before. Brinton approached the mic wielding a tambourine and announced that this was their first time at the Tractor Tavern and added, with a raised eyebrow, “it’s been a long time coming.” The room roared in response. Yes it had. The set found its pulse with a chilled, tambourine-led groove and, from that moment on, Brinton Jones, Jake Fish, Cameron Runyan, Jamie Timm, and Wren Kennedy did what they do best – the boys brought their ornate orchestrations to life with radiant, contagious energy. The tension built as the room awaited the approaching storm. And we weren’t the only ones frozen in anticipation. Behind us, Bryan John Appleby. To our right, members of The Head And The Heart. It speaks volumes of a band’s character when the local music community joins the celebration – and that they did. As we hoped, halfway through the set, the men of THATH jumped on stage and joined the chorus of “Magic Numbers,” filling out the sound with smiling harmonies, bouncing claps and shimmering tambourines. There may have been some ass slaps mixed in for good measure. Good game, indeed.
Read More

The Fire Note

Added on by Devil Whale.
Salt Lake City holds a bit of an indie secret that is slowly getting out, which is the band The Devil Whale. The now 5 piece has recently released their sophomore album Teeth and it is a smooth indie record that is full of vivid melodies, thought stirring lyrics and plenty of memorable hooks to keep you coming back for more.
Read More

Seattle Weekly

Added on by Devil Whale.
Dressed like your dad in the '70s and singing in close three-part harmony, The Devil Whale were more straight rock than any of this folk-rock stuff we've been messing around with lately. There was nary an acoustic guitar in sight. Instead two organs graced the stage, and the band played barn-burner after barn-burner while all the dudes in the audience enthusiastically nodded along
Read More

Bend Bulletin

Added on by Devil Whale.
First up on Wednesday is The Devil Whale, a Salt Lake City group whose psych-tinged pop-rock is tightly wound, bouncy and catchier than Velcro.
Read More

Icarus & Occident

Added on by Devil Whale.
Brinton Jones and his friends took the stage devil-may-care and with a strum from his guitar I realized I was about to be moved. A lot. The Devil Whale brings “shimmering psych-pop that bounces with 60s/70s nostalgia, folky grit and rock n’ roll swagger…” with heart.
Read More

Flagstaff Live - Review

Added on by Devil Whale.
One of the best ways to describe their sound is “buoyant.” Like listlessly floating fathoms above the ocean floor, there’s the melancholy, the frustration and there’s the sublime optimism of helplessness and letting go. Frontman Briton Jones’ lyrics have been called a “literature of the heart,” for the way he folds emotion into a four-minute tune with the precision of a classic author...
Read More

SSG Music - Review

Added on by Devil Whale.
On The Devil Whale‘s second full-length album, Teeth, songwriter/frontman Brinton Jones and bandmates deliver a heartfelt, visceral experience akin to their classic garage and pop influences such as The Animals, The Kinks, and Harry Nilsson. Like a grand painting, songs are well-defined, yet open to interpretation.
Read More

3Hive

Added on by Devil Whale.
The Devil Whale is a great band out of Salt Lake City. The music they play is a blend of 60′s and 70′s era folk, garage, and pop. They self-released their new full length Teeth at the end of May. It’s an excellent album as you can hear from the taste provided below, it has been on constant rotation since I got it.
Read More

Indie Shuffle - Review

Added on by Devil Whale.
Teeth is a collection of tightly composed, infectious pop rock ... The band’s energy and ear for catchy hooks don’t hurt things either; tracks are inherently listenable. What’s more, they’re good. Their musical capabilities make Teeth a true pleasure to listen to.
Read More

Indie Shuffle

Added on by Devil Whale.
I’m not sure if it’s possible to make a pop rock record that doesn’t sound, well, familiar in some way. Listening to Teeth, the second release from Utah band The Devil Whale, I’m not sure if that’s a bad thing, though. Teeth is a collection of tightly composed, infectious pop rock ... The band’s energy and ear for catchy hooks don’t hurt things either; tracks are inherently listenable. What’s more, they’re good.
Read More

KEXP - Review

Added on by Devil Whale.
This Salt Lake City band’s 2nd album is an impressive set of well-crafted folk-pop steeped in ‘60s psych-pop, ‘70s folk-rock and other classic sources. Produced by Seattle’s Shawn Simmons (The Head and The Heart, Grand Hallway, The Maldives), the album is loaded with beautifully arranged songs blending crunchy guitars, prominent piano and other keyboards, warm harmonies and some gorgeous melodies.
Read More

Visible Voice - Review

Added on by Devil Whale.
After one spin of Teeth I remembered why I was so floored the first time I'd heard it. Shimmering psych-pop that bounces with 60s/70s nostalgia, folky grit and rock n' roll swagger ... A complete album in both concept and execution and one of my favorite listens of the year so far.
Read More

Salt Lake Tribune

Added on by Devil Whale.
Brinton Jones isn’t recovering from a flesh-eating disease. Jake Fish hasn’t suffered spontaneous combustion, nor has he been killed in a bizarre gardening accident.Cameron Runyan has two arms, like the rest of us. Salt Lake City band The Devil Whale hasn’t endured any behind-the-scenes horrors that makes for a particularly interesting backstory. What the quintet offers is a determination to become the hardest-working band in Utah, as well as to play some great songs.
Read More

La Quenelle Culturelle

Added on by Devil Whale.
(we know this in French. we just like it.) Dans l’ombre de leurs copains folkeux The Head And The Heart, la formation de Seattle commence à prendre du galon. Sous l’impulsion d’un Brinton Jones dont le timbre de voix ne manque ni de chaleur ni de charisme, The Devil Whale sortait fin mai son second album intitulé Teeth, un recueil de chansons admirables qu’on rangerait volontiers parmi les perles Americana signées Jason Colett ou Dr Dog.
Read More